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Best Flashes for Fujifilm GFX100S

How many things have changed! A few short years ago, we were desperately searching for a respectable and best flash for Fujifilm cameras, one compatible with TTL (through the lens) metering and HSS (high-speed sync). This morning, when I looked for “Fujifilm TTL Flash” on the B&H website, it brought me a total of 56 different products for me to choose from. These days, decent flash units can be purchased easily from many vendors in any size desired.

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List of top flashes for Fujifilm GFX100S

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Fujifilm EF-X8

Fujifilm EF-X8

The Fujifilm EF-X8 is a compact and lightweight external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras.

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Fujifilm EF-X20

Fujifilm EF-X20

The Fujifilm EF-X20 is a compact and versatile external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras.

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Fujifilm EF-20

Fujifilm EF-20

The Fujifilm EF-20 is a compact and powerful external flash designed for Fujifilm X series cameras.

4
Fujifilm EF-42

Fujifilm EF-42

The Fujifilm EF-42 is a high-power external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, offering manual control and a guide number of 42.

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Fujifilm EF-X500

Fujifilm EF-X500

The Fujifilm EF-X500 is a versatile and powerful external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, featuring a guide number of 50, wireless control, and automatic zoom.

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GODOX TT350F

GODOX TT350F

The Godox TT350F is a compact and lightweight external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, with wireless control, a guide number of 36, and fast recycle time.

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Godox TT685F

Godox TT685F

The Godox TT685F is a powerful and versatile external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, featuring wireless control, a guide number of 60, and a tilt-swivel head.

8
Godox V860III-F

Godox V860III-F

The Godox V860III-F is a high-performance external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, offering wireless control, fast recycle time, and a guide number of 60.

9
Nissin NI-HI40F

Nissin NI-HI40F

The Nissin NI-HI40F is a high-power external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, featuring a guide number of 40, fast recycle time, and wireless control.

10
Nissin i60A

Nissin i60A

The Nissin i60A is a compact and versatile external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, offering wireless control, fast recycle time, and a guide number of 60.

11
Nissin Di700

Nissin Di700

The Nissin Di700 is a powerful and versatile external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, featuring wireless control, fast recycle time, and a guide number of 48.

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Nissin MG10

Nissin MG10

The Nissin MG10 is a compact and lightweight external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, with wireless control, fast recycle time, and a guide number of 36.

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Metz M400

Metz M400

The Metz M400 is a compact and lightweight external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, offering fast recycle time, manual control, and a guide number of 40.

14
Metz 44 AF-2

Metz 44 AF-2

The Metz 44 AF-2 is a powerful and versatile external flash for Fujifilm X series cameras, featuring wireless control, fast recycle time, and a guide number of 44.

In this post, I will walk you through the specialized alternatives for our Fujifilm cameras, which range in price from fifty dollars to five thousand dollars. Because there are so many, I’m not going to bother mentioning all of the wonderful flash guns compatible with Fujifilm cameras and can be used in full manual mode. The combination of the Cactus RF60 and the V6 (Mk1) was, in my opinion, the best of the lot back in the bad old days before Fujifilm introduced HSS.

Unfortunately, the “one unit fits all makes of camera” hot shoe design of the V6 Mk2 transceiver was not a successful innovation. Users of Fujifilm cameras who have purchased the Cactus V6 mk2 are divided into two groups: those whose cameras operate without a hitch and those who, like myself, cannot get their cameras to function in any way. Many different devices and firmware have been tested, but I have not found any that produce consistent results.

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Fujifilm EF-X8

(TTL)

Beginning with something more compact, we have the Fujifilm EF-X8, the “pop-up” flash unit included in the package with the X-T1, and several other X Series cameras. It is impossible to buy it on its own, and, to tell you the truth; it only has a few different applications. I also received a second EF-X8 lens along with my X-H1 purchase. I put that one through its paces on the X-T2, and while it performed admirably, it was a total bust on the GFX. I bring it up here to provide a whole picture.

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Fujifilm EF-X20

(TTL)

Certain photographers prefer to work with a little blip of flash from a close range, and for those photographers, the Fujifilm EF-x20 is by far the most excellent unit that has been launched to complement the X30 camera.

It is self-powered, packs a punch with a guide number of 20, and sits closer to the lens to get optimal results. Because of the possibility of casting a shadow when using this flash for Fujifilm GFX100S with bigger lenses or lens hoods, the XF series of lenses with a tapered f/2 aperture or the X100 series of cameras are the best options for using this flash.

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Fujifilm EF-20

(TTL)

This device has a guide number of 20, the same as the EF-X20, but it can tilt upwards by 90 degrees, making it more versatile. However, it is far more extensive than its predecessor, which was much smaller and required two AA batteries.

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Fujifilm EF-42

(TTL)

This flash for Fujifilm GFX100S, which is of moderate size, is powered by four AA-sized batteries. Although it may not provide excellent value for the money, it does contain the Fujifilm brand on the front, providing some customers with peace of mind.

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Fujifilm EF-500

(TTL, HSS and wireless remote)

Fujifilm’s top-of-the-line hot shoe flash unit was the first to be created entirely within the company and included all its available features. This flash is compatible with the complete lineup of Fujifilm X and GFX cameras, including the newest models. Because of its weight, the EF-500 may impose a significant amount of pressure on the top plate of an X Series camera, which is especially problematic when the camera is set to portrait mode. Because Fujifilm does not yet offer a dedicated transmitter, the wireless remote capability will require purchasing a second EF-500 unit.

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Godox TT350F

(TTL, HSS, and wireless remote)

This well-liked shoe-mount flash unit from Godox is a tiny Speedlight that can be used either as a wireless radio transmitter in firing or non-firing master mode or as a flash unit with a shoe mount. Receiving signals may also be done remotely using this device. The TT350F is compatible with the Godox 2.4GHz system, consisting of several event devices, including the fantastic AD-200 and AD-600 models.

I observed that the TT350’s radio transmitter range was somewhat limited, and its output power was restricted. Perhaps that might be OK in a studio, but it would not be perfect outside. So when managing distant flashes, an RF transmitter from Godox, either the X-1TF or XProF, is your best chance.

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Godox TT685F

(TTL, HSS, and wireless remote)

This flash unit has been thoughtfully developed, and it’s on a level with the finest Canon and Nikon offerings. It is a direct rival to the Fujifilm EF-500 and requires 4 AA batteries. In addition, the TT685F can work with the entire Godox 2.4GHz system, consisting of several different devices, including the fantastic AD-200 and AD-600 models.

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Godox V860llF

(TTL, HSS, and wireless remote)

The Godox V860llF, sometimes known as the Ving 860llF to give it its full name, is the company’s top-of-the-line hot shoe flash. Instead of annoying AA batteries, it employs a lithium battery that has a long life and is detachable and rechargeable.

The Godox V860llF is the most impressive on-camera flash unit for Fujifilm GFX100S currently available for Fujifilm cameras. The magnificent AD-200 and AD-600 units, as well as several other Godox products, are among those that are compatible with the V860llF’s 2.4GHz Godox system compatibility.

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Nissin i40

(TTL)

This extremely portable Speedlight has a good sense of proportion when attached to a camera from the Fujifilm X Series. The Fujifilm TTL control is available, and it can accommodate four AA-sized batteries. Unfortunately, the software of the i40 cannot be upgraded without sending the device back to the manufacturer, and earlier models of the device cannot use high-speed sync with Fujifilm cameras.

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Nissin i60A

It is the bigger brother of the i40 and is compatible with the great Nissin Air 10s-specific transmitter for Fujifilm cameras. This transmitter provides TTL, HSS, and back curtain sync.

11

Nissin Di700

This is the most potent and advanced Speedlight that Nissin offers. It is equipped with a 2.4 GHz transmitter and can perform all of the expected functions of a Speedlight.

12

Nissin MG10

It is a high-powered hammerhead flash gun for Fujifilm X100S that a commander can only fire. Even though it does not have a hot-shoe mount, the Di700 would be a good match for this flash.

13

Metz M400

(TTL and HSS)

One of the most well-known and respected independent flash manufacturers created this teeny-tiny device. It also features HSS and back curtain sync capabilities, among other things. In addition, it features a straightforward user interface and operates on four batteries of size AA.

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Metz 44 AF-2

(TTL and HSS)

This Metz Speedlight is more significant and significantly more potent than its predecessor, and it features a back curtain sync capability in addition to HSS and other features. However, it requires four batteries of AA size.

What became the company Profoto? Unfortunately, the much-anticipated Profoto A1 for Fujifilm has not materialized since this article was written, and the firm is no longer focusing on developing this device.

Phottix is said to be looming on the horizon, and rumors have it that the company is inventing a universal trigger that, when turned on, will attempt to recognize your camera. Another business that tried to market a universal trigger is Cactus; however, this strategy did not prove successful for Fujifilm photographers.

15

Meike/Neewer MK320

The Meike/Neewer MK320 (TTL, no HSS) is a good speedlight accessible online via third-party vendors on Amazon. It is affordable, compact, and powerful. However, one member of the Fujilove community who has a dog used the phrase “a bit hit and miss” to describe it.

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Buying Guide

How to find the best flash for Fujifilm GFX100S

To find the best flash for Fujifilm GFX100S, consider the following factors:

  1. Compatibility: Ensure the second is compatible with the camera’s hot shoe.
  2. Guide number: The guide number indicates the flash’s power and the distance it can illuminate. Choose a moment with a high guide number.
  3. Recycle time: The recycle time is the amount of time it takes for the flash to recharge after firing. Consider a moment with a fast recycling time.
  4. Features: Look for a flash with tilt and swivel heads, wireless control, and automatic zoom.
  5. Brand: Fujifilm and third-party brands such as Godox, Nissin, and Profoto offer high-quality flash options for the GFX100S.
  6. User reviews: Read user reviews and compare different models to see which ones are highly rated for use with the GFX100S.
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FAQs

FAQs for best flash for Fujifilm GFX100S

What flash should I get for Fujifilm GFX 100S?

Fujifilm EF-X500, Godox V1, Nissin i60A, Profoto A1X, and Metz Mecablitz 64 AF-1 are all compatible, high-quality options for the Fujifilm GFX100S. Choose based on your needs for guide number, features, and recycling time.

What is the flash sync speed of the Fujifilm GFX 100S?

The flash sync speed of the Fujifilm GFX 100S is 1/125 sec. This allows the camera to synchronize the flash with the shutter to produce well-balanced and properly exposed images. It is essential to choose a moment with a fast recycling time to take advantage of the camera’s flash sync speed fully.

What is ISO best for flash?

The best ISO for flash photography depends on the situation and desired effect. Generally, a lower ISO (e.g. ISO 100 or 200) will result in a less noisy image and a better dynamic range. However, using a higher ISO (e.g. ISO 800 or higher) can be helpful in low-light situations to reduce motion blur and maintain a fast shutter speed.

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