HomePhotographyHow to/Tips7 Commonly Made Errors in Photography That Are Easily Avoidable

7 Commonly Made Errors in Photography That Are Easily Avoidable

7 Photography MISTAKES that are EASY to avoid

Watching an experienced person provide feedback on images is one of the best methods to gain an understanding of the many faults that may be made in photography. This video is just that, and it includes seven errors that may be easily avoided by the viewer.

When it comes to your own photos, it’s not always easy to remain objective, which isn’t always a negative thing in and of itself. If I like the picture, who cares if you can’t draw six squares over the top and circle intersections of the lines? I’ve spoken in the past about how some of my favorite shots from recent times break rules and don’t fit neatly into familiar compositions, and I’m fine with that. If I like the picture, who cares if you can’t draw six squares over the top and circle intersections of the lines? However, there are occasions, especially when you are fresher to the profession when you need to accept the fact that more experienced photographers do not like certain parts of your image. This is especially true when it comes to critiques of your work.

My very first photo shoot with a model is the one that immediately comes to mind as an illustration of this principle. Although this “model” wasn’t formally signed, she had been in the past and was an excellent subject. I organized a shoot at a fantastic location, and together we captured a large number of images that I found appealing. However, there was one that I was actually quite fond of, and I considered it to be one of the nicest photographs that I had taken.

Several months later, I placed it into a competition in which photos are judged, and it was completely disregarded. After I’d finished licking my wounds, I realized what they were saying, and I realized they were correct. (For the record, the cause was excessive exposure. I believed I was going for a high-key effect, but in reality, I’d missed the point and lost the texture.

In this video, professional landscape photographer Nigel Danson critiques the work of some of the channel’s viewers, pointing out the aspects of their photographs that are strong as well as those that want improvement. Anyone who is interested in making improvements to their landscape photography will find this video to be quite helpful.

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