Fujifilm X-T10 Review

There are some great compact system or mirrorless cameras around at the moment, but with its solid build, retro SLR-like styling, traditional controls and excellent image quality the Fuji X-T1 is one of our favourites. We’re not alone in this, as it’s also proved very popular with enthusiasts and professional photographers looking for a smaller (and funkier) alternative to an SLR.

Now we have the Fuji X-T10, a slightly more compact mini-me of the X-T1 that uses the same APS-C format 16Mp X Trans CMOS II sensor and EXR Processor, also found in the Fuji X-E2 and Fuji X100T. This sensor also houses phase-detection autofocusing points that makeup part of the camera’s hybrid AF system, which Fuji claims have a focus time of just 0.06 seconds.

Fujifilm X-T10 (Specs)

  • Sensor: 16.3 MP (1.5x crop factor), 4.8µ pixel size, same as on XT1.
  • Sensor Size: 23.6 x 15.6mm.
  • Resolution: 4896 x 3264.
  • Native ISO Sensitivity: 200-6,400.
  • Boost Low ISO Sensitivity: 100.
  • Boost High ISO Sensitivity: 12,800-25,600.

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Fujifilm X-T10 Body Silver Mirrorless Digital Camera
  • 16MP X-Trans CMOS II Sensor W/ EXR Processor II
  • New Auto Focus System - Single, Zone, Wide x AF-S, AF-C - 3D Tracking (Wide x AF-C) - Phase Detection + Contrast
  • 2.36M dot OLED Electronic VF - World’s shortest display lag time 0.005sec. - 0.62x Finder Magnification

Fujifilm X-T10: Build and Handling

Over on the left of the top-plate, where the X-T1 has a dial to set sensitivity, is a drive mode dial. In addition to providing a means of setting the camera to Single, Continuous Low (speed) and Continuous High (speed) shooting (up to eight frames per second) this has options for accessing the bracketing, Advanced Filter (there are two settings for this), Multiple exposure and Panorama modes. There are two bracketing options, one for publicity bracketing and another for Film Simulation bracketing, enabling you to produce a sequence of three images with different exposures or various Film Simulation settings.

Fuji’s Quick menu system is very good, and it’s possible to customise it on the X-T10 with 27 different options being available to be assigned to any of the scene locations. It’s nice to be able exclude features that you don’t use in preference for those that you do.

Fujifilm X-T10: Performance

The X-T10 has the same X Trans CMOS II sensor and processing engine as the Fuji X-T1, so the quality of the images from the new camera doesn’t come as much of a surprise. It’s capable of capturing an impressive level of detail, especially for a 16Mp camera. That’s thanks in part to the sensor design, which doesn’t require an anti-aliasing filter to avoid moire interference.

Noise is also controlled well throughout the native sensitivity range, and even at the maximum setting (ISO 6,400) images retain a high level of detail. JPEG files recorded at this setting have an even texture of luminance noise visible at 100%, but they still look good and there’s enough detail present to produce nice A3 (11.7 x 16.6inch) prints. As usual raw files have some chroma sound, but this can be controlled easily, enabling you to find a good balance between noise and detail.

The JPEGs captured at the lowest expansion setting, ISO 12,800, are pretty good, and also ISO 25,600 produces reasonable results, but I would avoid using the utmost environment unless it’s vital to get an image, as there’s noticeable softening at normal viewing or printing sizes.

Like the X-T1, the X-T10 produces very attractive images in a wide range of situations. Fuji is widely respected for its colour reproduction, and the Film Simulation modes are very popular. My favourite is Classic Chrome, which produces quite muted colours with a warm tone, but the standard option, Provia will be a good all-rounder, while Velvia is great for creating images with more saturation. This is backed up by an auto white balance system that performs well in most natural lighting situations, although images shot in really overcast or shaded conditions can look a little cool.

Verdict

The X-T10 is a great camera for those wanting to get more serious about their photography, but it’s also a good choice for more experienced photographers and those looking for a backup to their X-T1. Although it is a compromise on the X-T1, it doesn’t feel like much of one, and it produces the same high-quality images. In addition, the autofocus system has taken a big step forward, making it much easier to shoot moving subjects.

Check Fujifilm X-T10 Price
Fujifilm X-T10 Body Silver Mirrorless Digital Camera
  • 16MP X-Trans CMOS II Sensor W/ EXR Processor II
  • New Auto Focus System - Single, Zone, Wide x AF-S, AF-C - 3D Tracking (Wide x AF-C) - Phase Detection + Contrast
  • 2.36M dot OLED Electronic VF - World’s shortest display lag time 0.005sec. - 0.62x Finder Magnification

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